If you’re a medical or public health professional and want to volunteer, here are some organizations looking for people like you: 

If you can’t volunteer, you can always donate to great organizations working hard to halt the spread. Here are just some organizations I could think of:

By all means this is not an exhaustive list. But in order to turn the tide on this epidemic we need all the good people we can get. I’m contributing to the efforts and I hope some of you do, too. And if you know other organizations that are looking for volunteers or donations, let me know and I can update this list. 

nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

How Could A Doctor’s Death From Ebola Possibly Be ‘Good’?
Here are three words you don’t often see in close proximity: Good. Death. Ebola.
Yet there they stand, united in the headline for an essay in The New England Journal of Medicine this month: "A Good Death: Ebola and Sacrifice."
The essay was written by Dr. Josh Mugele, assistant professor of clinical emergency medicine at Indiana University’s School of Medicine, and Chad Priest, an assistant dean at the Indiana University School of Nursing. They pay tribute to a Liberian colleague, Dr. Samuel Brisbane, director of the emergency department at Monrovia’s John F. Kennedy Memorial Medical Center.
They’d worked closely with Sam Brisbane on a disaster-medicine program. He was a memorable character, they write: “at once caring and profane … his laugh was best described as a giggle, and he swore frequently.”
And he was terrified by Ebola. “Dr. Brisbane was a wreck,” they recall. When they asked how they could protect themselves, he told the authors: “Leave Monrovia.”
his summer, Dr. Brisbane treated a patient with “suspected Ebola.” A few days later, the 74-year-old doctor came down with symptoms of the virus. He died on July 26.
"With apologies to his wife and family, who saw him dire horribly and unjustly," Mugele and Priest conclude, "we believe our friend died a good death – as did all the nurses and doctors who have sacrificed themselves caring for patients with this awful disease."
We spoke with Mugele and Priest about the idea of a “good death.”
You believe Dr. Brisbane died a good death because of his self-sacrifice?
Mugele: Dr. Brisbane was an older gentleman, he had a coffee plantation, he had a wife and children. He didn’t have to treat these patients. He didn’t­­­­ have to be a doctor at that stage of his life. And he kept doing it even though he knew [Ebola] was very contagious and he had a high likelihood of getting it. Dying was a selfless act on his part.
Continue reading.
Illustration by Maria Fabrizio for NPR

nprglobalhealth:

How Could A Doctor’s Death From Ebola Possibly Be ‘Good’?

Here are three words you don’t often see in close proximity: Good. Death. Ebola.

Yet there they stand, united in the headline for an essay in The New England Journal of Medicine this month: "A Good Death: Ebola and Sacrifice."

The essay was written by Dr. Josh Mugele, assistant professor of clinical emergency medicine at Indiana University’s School of Medicine, and Chad Priest, an assistant dean at the Indiana University School of Nursing. They pay tribute to a Liberian colleague, Dr. Samuel Brisbane, director of the emergency department at Monrovia’s John F. Kennedy Memorial Medical Center.

They’d worked closely with Sam Brisbane on a disaster-medicine program. He was a memorable character, they write: “at once caring and profane … his laugh was best described as a giggle, and he swore frequently.”

And he was terrified by Ebola. “Dr. Brisbane was a wreck,” they recall. When they asked how they could protect themselves, he told the authors: “Leave Monrovia.”

his summer, Dr. Brisbane treated a patient with “suspected Ebola.” A few days later, the 74-year-old doctor came down with symptoms of the virus. He died on July 26.

"With apologies to his wife and family, who saw him dire horribly and unjustly," Mugele and Priest conclude, "we believe our friend died a good death – as did all the nurses and doctors who have sacrificed themselves caring for patients with this awful disease."

We spoke with Mugele and Priest about the idea of a “good death.”

You believe Dr. Brisbane died a good death because of his self-sacrifice?

Mugele: Dr. Brisbane was an older gentleman, he had a coffee plantation, he had a wife and children. He didn’t have to treat these patients. He didn’t­­­­ have to be a doctor at that stage of his life. And he kept doing it even though he knew [Ebola] was very contagious and he had a high likelihood of getting it. Dying was a selfless act on his part.

Continue reading.

Illustration by Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Money and manpower for public health should be the rule, not the exception. 

For any medical professionals out there, Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is looking for people to help in West Africa. Priority jobs include doctors, nurses, and water/sanitation experts. If you or anyone you know is interested, click here.

nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

Barbara Bush may be known as the quieter of the Bush twins, but when it comes to global health, she’s anything but. At 32, the Yale graduate is co-founder and CEO of Global Health Corps, a nonprofit organization that pairs young volunteers with health and development organizations.
We caught up with Bush earlier this summer at the U.N., where she spoke about the role of entrepreneurs at this year’s Global Accelerator conference, which discussed innovations needed to tackle issues like reproductive health, job creation and water and sanitation.
She hadn’t set out to work in this field, she told us.
Read our interview here: A Trip With Her Folks Turned Barbara Bush Into A Global Activist

Global Health Corps is a fantastic organization; I still feel connected, no matter where I am and will be in my career. If you’re interested in learning more about them and their fellowship program, check out http://ghcorps.org 

nprglobalhealth:

Barbara Bush may be known as the quieter of the Bush twins, but when it comes to global health, she’s anything but. At 32, the Yale graduate is co-founder and CEO of Global Health Corps, a nonprofit organization that pairs young volunteers with health and development organizations.

We caught up with Bush earlier this summer at the U.N., where she spoke about the role of entrepreneurs at this year’s Global Accelerator conference, which discussed innovations needed to tackle issues like reproductive health, job creation and water and sanitation.

She hadn’t set out to work in this field, she told us.

Read our interview here: A Trip With Her Folks Turned Barbara Bush Into A Global Activist

Global Health Corps is a fantastic organization; I still feel connected, no matter where I am and will be in my career. If you’re interested in learning more about them and their fellowship program, check out http://ghcorps.org 

Thanks Washington Post on writing about everything that made me question the Newsweek’s cover story, “Smuggled bushmeat is Ebola’s Back Door.” I only put Newsweek’s link so you can read how ignorant some people are about this disease. 

Two main things: 

  1. Bushmeat = wild game. 
  2. Fruit bats, NOT chimpanzees, are thought to be the reservoir for Ebola.

That is all. 

likechipanddale

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

Let us not forget their voices